" + $site_name + " logo
Login

 
 
Chapel Hill's Greatest Fathers

by Charly Mann

Chapel Hill was blessed with an abundance of great fathers in the 1950s. Somehow these men who had grown up in the Great Depression and most of whom were veterans of World War II were all kind, honest, decent, and selfless individuals. They all enjoyed their work, but loved their families even more. These guys were authority figures who did not often have to give instructions. Through their own actions you knew what was expected. They really did inspire by example. Besides my own wonderful Dad, I saw these characteristics in the fathers of many of my closest friends including, Henry Brandis, who was Dean of the Law School, Bob Cox, who was a downtown merchant, David McGowan, who was a pharmaceutical salesman and reminded me of Fred McMurray on My Three Sons, George Prillaman, who ran UNC Food Services such as Lenoir Hall and was the personification of cool, and Sandy McClamroch who was the Mayor of Chapel Hill for most of the 1960s and owned WCHL yet was as laid back as Ozzie Nelson in the Adventures of Ozzie and Harriett. These men were great to be around and each left an indelible impression on me about how to be a responsible adult and father.

...

Full content including photographs now available on a subscription basis.

See Subscribe button in upper right corner.

 
 

 
 
Chapel Hill's Favorite Restaurants

by Charly Mann

Over the last several months I have enjoyed meeting with a large number of former Chapel Hillians. Invariably our conversations would turn to their most cherished culinary delights of the town. Among their favorites were The Ramshead Rathskeller, La Residence, Harry’sThe House of Chu, Ye Old Waffle Shop, The Dairy Bar, Landlubber’s Seafood, and The Poet’s Corner. Only the Waffle Shop and La Residence remain among these revered institutions, though there is some chance The Rathskeller may someday reopen (the planned re-opening has been pushed back several times and the "new" owner has not replied to my recent inquires about the project's status). I have already written articles on the Rat and Harry's for Chapel Hill Memories, and plan to do an in depth one on La Residence in the future, but to rekindle your appetite here is a visual taste tribute to all of these restaurants.

...

Full content including photographs now available on a subscription basis.

See Subscribe button in upper right corner.

 
 

 
 
UNC Chancellor Robert House - One of a Kind

By Bill Anthony UNC Class of 1965 (all photos provided by Charly Mann)

...

Full content including photographs now available on a subscription basis.

See Subscribe button in upper right corner.

 
 

 
 
Bland Simpson - Renaissance Man of Chapel Hill

by Charly Mann

Bland Simpson is a Chapel Hillian with an absurd diversity of talents. He is a composer of highly regarded musicals, an author, teacher, sometime member of the renowned eclectic string band The Red Clay Ramblers, and a skilled house painter. In the late 1960s and early 70s it seemed like Bland was destined to become a singer-songwriter superstar like his friend James Taylor and mentor Bob Dylan.

...

Full content including photographs now available on a subscription basis.

See Subscribe button in upper right corner.

 
 

 
 
A 1942 Chapel Hill Fish Tale

by Stanley Peele

In Chapel Hill there is a small stream which starts in a marshy spot north of the western end of McCauley St. It then meanders down between Merritt Mill Road and Westwood Drive and then runs on down to Morgan Creek.

...

Full content including photographs now available on a subscription basis.

See Subscribe button in upper right corner.

 
 

 
 
How to Think Like a Chapel Hillian

by Charly Mann

For most of its history the core of Chapel Hill thinking meant questioning the politically correct ideas of the day. This critical thinking is rooted in two debating organizations formed in 1795 which at one time every UNC student had to belong to. Members were expected to be able to speak extemporaneously and persuasively for five to seven minutes on any side of an issue. These groups also required students to spend several hours every day reading political speeches and editorials in newspapers, and then writing a weekly composition in support or opposition to something they had read.

...

Full content including photographs now available on a subscription basis.

See Subscribe button in upper right corner.

 
 

Bite Sized Facts Link for Useful facts, financial success, universal truths, and great health info



Chapel Hill is located on a hill whose only distinguishing feature in the 18th century was a small chapel on top called New Hope Chapel. This church was built in 1752 and is currently the location of The Carolina Inn. The town was founded in 1819, and chartered in 1851.

 

 

What is it that binds us to this place as to no other? It is not the well or the bell or the stone walls. or the crisp October nights. No, our love for this place is based upon the fact that it is as it was meant to be, The University of the People.

-- Charles Kuralt

 

 

Dark Side of the Hill -- Pink Floyd, the creators of the most popular album in history, Dark Side of the Moon, took the second half of their name from Floyd Council, a Chapel Hill native, and great blues singer and guitarist. He once belonged to a group called "The Chapel Hillbillies".

 

 

Check out Charly Mann's other website:
Oklahoma Birds and Butterflies
oklahomabirdsandbutterflies.com
http://oklahomabirdsandbutterflies.com

 



We need your help. Send your submissions, ideas, photos, and questions to CHMemories@gmail.com.

 

 

 

 

There would probably be no Chapel Hill if the University of North Carolina Board of Trustees in 1793 had not chosen land across from New Hope Chapel for the location of the university. By 1800 there were about 100 people living in thirty houses surrounding the campus.

 

 

The University North Carolina's first student was Hinton James, who enrolled in February, 1795. There is now a dormitory on the campus named in his honor.

 

 

 

 

The University of North Carolina was closed from 1870 to 1875 because of lack of state funding.

 

 

 

 

William Ackland left his art collection and $1.25 million to Duke University in 1940 on the condition that he would be buried in the art museum that the University was to build with his bequest. Duke rejected this condition even though members of the Duke Family are buried in Duke Chapel. What followed was a long and acrimonious legal battle between Ackland relatives who now wanted the inheritance, Rollins College, and the University of North Carolina, each attempting to receive the funds. The case went all the way to the United States Supreme Court, and in 1949 UNC was awarded the money for the museum. Ackland is buried near the museum's entrance. When the museum first opened, in the early sixties, there were rumors that his remains were leaking out of the mausoleum.

 

 

The official name of the Arboretum on the University of North Carolina campus is the Coker Arboretum. It is named after Dr. William Cocker, the University's first botany professor. It occupies a little more than five acres. It was founded in 1903.

 

 

Chapel Hill's main street has always been called Franklin Street. It was named after Benjamin Franklin in the early 1790s.

 

 



We need your help. Send your submissions, ideas, photos, and questions to CHMemories@gmail.com.

 

 

Chapel Hill High School and Chapel Hill Junior High were on Franklin Street in the same location as University Square until the mid 1960s.

 

 

The Colonial Drug Store at 450 West Franklin Street was owned and operated by John Carswell. It was famous for a fresh-squeezed carbonated orange beverage called a "Big O". In the early 1970s, I managed the Record and Tape Center next door, and must have had over 100 of those drinks. The Colonial Drug Store closed in 1996.

 

 

Sutton's Drugstore, which opened in 1923, has one of the last soda fountains in the South. It is one of the few businesses remaining on Franklin Street that was in operation when I was growing up in the 1950s.

 

 

Future President Gerald Ford lived in Chapel Hill twice. First when he was 24, in 1938, he took a law couse in summer school at UNC. He lived in the Carr Building, which was a law school dormitory. At the same time, Richard Nixon, the man he served under as Vice President, was attending law school at Duke. In 1942, Ford returned to Chapel Hill to attend the U.S. Navy's Pre-Flight School training program. He lived in a rental house on Hidden Hills Drive.

 

 

All rights reserved on Chapel Hill Memories photography and content

Contact us