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The History of Chapel Hill's Ram's Head Rathskeller

by Charly Mann

Dianne Fountain, the new owner of The Rathskeller, just sent me the following status report on the progress of the impending reopening:

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Franklin Street - The Heart and Soul of Chapel Hill

Throughout my lifetime Franklin Street was Chapel Hill. It was where all my favorite people congregated or worked. It was also where I saw at least one illustrious Chapel Hillian or Carolina alum nearly every time I walked down the street, including people like Charles Kuralt, Betty Smith, Bill Friday, Vermont Royster, Andy Griffith, and Kay Kyser. In this article I will try to describe in detail the essence of what made downtown Chapel Hill one of the most wonderful places in the world. 

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The Rathskeller Today and Yesterday
Many Chapel Hill Memories readers have contacted me about the status of the planned reopening of The Ratskeller by Diane Fountain, originally scheduled for more than three years ago. We recently received the following sad news from a former longtime Rat employee.
 
In late February of 2012, Mary Stockwell, the general manager of Munch Family Properties (who owns the Rat's building), terminated Diane Fountain's lease, changed the locks and forbade her from again entering to the premises. Apparently, Diane had failed to pay the architects and the other construction workers who were due money, and this was a violation of her lease.
 

An ad for the Rathskeller in 1951

Months thereafter, Morris Commercial, the real estate company representing Munch Family Properties, began renovation work on the Rathskeller's old building. Presently, it intends to lease its space to as many as three tenants, though no lessees have, heretofore, expressed any interest in the property.


Ratskeller Menu Prices in 1954


Inside the Rathskeller in 1989

One thing is for sure: The Rathskeller will never again occupy its previous location. Not long after the termination of Diane Fountain's lease, she attempted to procure a location in NCNB plaza in the old "Ram Triple Theatre" location. That fell through as well. The reason apparently was lack of funding. Diane had spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on consultants fees, copyright procurements, demolition work and the like, and virtually all of this activity has availed nothing substantive.

The final nail in the coffin came on May 23 of this year when the NC Secretary of State's Corporations Division administratively dissolved Rathskeller Partners, LLC (Diane Fountain's company). Apparently, she had failed to file an annual report for 2012. Assuming no other entity assumes that corporate name, Diane can file for reinstatement in accordance with NC law.


Free Beer or Wine was a great incentive for many Chapel Hillians to dine at The Rathskeller

Finally, in a matter unrelated to the foregoing, Ed "Squeaky" Morgan, waiter from 1960 to 1993 and then again from 2002 to 2007, died at UNC Hospitals on October 13, aged 72. A cause of death was not revealed.

On a happier note, Ed Carr shared a beautiful story about downtown Chapel Hill that includes a happy ending at The Rathskeller:

It was the fall of 1967. My date and I enjoyed a meal of lasagna, bread and salad at the Rat, and we had some extra time, so we walked down to the Record Bar. Frankly, I loved that place, and took any excuse to hang out there. My date watched, on the brink of impatience, while I dug through the 45's for the hundredth time, and I noticed a young couple coming through the door.

 
Bobbie Gentry and Glen Campbell played at UNC in the Fall of 1968. 

She was attractive and wearing a pretty black and soft red dress. He was handsome and wearing jeans, a blue oxford shirt and a camel corduroy jacket. I recognized his face and hurried toward the door with my hand extended, grabbed his hand, and said to my date, "Let me introduce you to Glen Campbell." He replied, "Let me introduce you to Bobbie Gentry."


Glen Campbell arriving at the airport in 1968. A few years before he had played in Greensboro with The Beach Boys as a replacement for Brian Wilson.

Nobody else in the store seemed to notice, so we had them all to ourselves. Bobbie explained they were in town for a concert that evening, and we proudly showed off our tickets. She said they stopped by the Record Bar to see if their records were on the shelves. I ushered them to the proper shelf and pointed out their records. They seemed pleased.


Bobbie Gentry performing at UNC in 1968

When the evening was over I had enjoyed dining at the Rat, engaged in a memorable conversation with two up-and-coming music stars, got autographs on two 45 records - Ode to Billy Joe, and Gentle on My Mind, attended a fine concert, and impressed my date. ...A typical evening in Chapel Hill.


Charly Mann enjoying a pizza at The Rathskeller in 2003

All photos and ads in this article provided by Charly Mann

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Chapel Hill's Favorite Restaurants

by Charly Mann

Over the last several months I have enjoyed meeting with a large number of former Chapel Hillians. Invariably our conversations would turn to their most cherished culinary delights of the town. Among their favorites were The Ramshead Rathskeller, La Residence, Harry’sThe House of Chu, Ye Old Waffle Shop, The Dairy Bar, Landlubber’s Seafood, and The Poet’s Corner. Only the Waffle Shop and La Residence remain among these revered institutions, though there is some chance The Rathskeller may someday reopen (the planned re-opening has been pushed back several times and the "new" owner has not replied to my recent inquires about the project's status). I have already written articles on the Rat and Harry's for Chapel Hill Memories, and plan to do an in depth one on La Residence in the future, but to rekindle your appetite here is a visual taste tribute to all of these restaurants.

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The Carolina Grill and Caffe Trio R.I.P.

by Charly Mann

The Carolina Grill was located on West Franklin Street just beyond Fowler's Grocery Store and across from the bus station. I recall the place opening in the early 1960s and featuring good and very inexpensive food. I also believe it the first place on Franklin Street that featured bands several nights a week.

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Ramshead Rathskeller Returns from the Dead!

by Charly Mann

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The Goody Shop - Chapel Hill's First Sports Bar

by Charly Mann

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Hector's of Chapel Hill - Famous Since 1969

by Charly Mann

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The Rat (Ramshead Rathskeller)

by Charly Mann

The History of the Rathskeller, The Rat, Amber Alley, Chapel Hill, NC

The Rat in 1963 (burgundy was a popular color than year)

 Map of the Ram's Head Rathskeller, Chapel Hill, NC

The Ram's Head Rathskeller, better known as “The Rat” opened in 1948 by Ted Danziger. For much of its history there were long lines in Amber Alley waiting for seating at peak lunch and dinner hours. The Rat had everything, a variety of great food, impecable service, and an atmosphere of romance, and Chapel Hill tradition.

Eating the Rat's famous Apple Pie and Ice Cream, Ratskeller, Chapel Hill, NC
The Rat was the first of at least four incredible restaurants owned and operated by Danziger, including The Ranch House, the Zoom Zoom, and the Villa Teo. The Rat was located in what was originally a dilapidated basement under a successful gift and candy store owned by Ted’s parents, called DANZIGER’S. That business was started in 1939, and occupied the location that had been Gooch's Restaurant. The Rat’s food was incredible. They were famous for an array of specialties including their chewy steak called The Gambler, which was served on a sizzling iron plate. They also had the first, and many say the best, pizza in Chapel Hill, as well as incredible lasagna. Their most popular drink was not beer, but the sweetest ice tea you can imagine, served in large pitchers. Their signature desert was  great apple pie which one could watch warming from a window in Amber Alley. It was usually served with cheese or vanilla ice cream.

The Gambler steak and menu of the Ram's Head Ratskeller, Franklin Street, Chapel Hill, NC

The Rat in 1950, then only two years old


Ted oversaw The Rat and The Ranch House until he died in 1965. His wife Bibi continued and expanded the Danziger Empire, while maintaining the standards Ted had established. Unfortunately neither of their sons, Avery or Randy seemed to have restaurant genes, and after Bibi’s death the restaurant fortunes declined until it closed in 2008.


I started going to The Rat when I was about five, and continued doing so as often as I could during the next fifty plus years. I had my first date there when I was in the fourth grade with Brook Barnes, and in the sixth grade convinced Terry Boyce to go there with me. Remarkably the wait staff never seemed to change or age, and included great men like Kenny Mann Sr., Ulysses Cozart, and Jim Cotton. 
 

Pizza at the Rat, Chapel Hill, NC, Franklin Street, The Ratskeller

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HARRY'S RESTAURANT (1926 - 1972)

by Charly Mann

1926 saw the birth of famous Tarheel Andy Griffith, as well as Fidel Castro, Marilyn Monroe, and Hugh Hefner. Also in 1926, Chapel Hill welcomed the opening of the first restaurant that offered food that was not traditionally Southern. The name of the restaurant was HARRY’S, and the owner was Harry Stern. Though not an authentic deli or coffee shop, its culinary offerings had a combination bohemian and New York City flare.


HARRY'S ad from 1936 when it was owned by original owner Harry Stern

The first location of HARRY'S was across the street from where Four Corners restaurant is now located. In 1927 it moved down Franklin Street next to the Carolina Theater (now the location of The Gap). Harry Stern's brother-in-law Harry Macklin bought the restaurant in 1939, and conveniently its name still fit. This was a challenging time to get into the restaurant business with the Depression in full swing and most males leaving Chapel Hill after 1942 to serve in World War II. Macklin sold the restaurant in 1944, and it had one more owner after that until it finally closed in 1952.


HARRY's ad from 1943 just before Harry Macklin sold  the business in 1944

In 1954 Harry Macklin reopened HARRY'S on the north side of Franklin Street just a few doors west of the Post Office. In 1960 it moved just a few doors east to the location most of us remember as HARRY'S at 175 East Franklin Street next to the downtown Post Office. Throughout the sixties HARRY’S was the intellectual and radical hub of Chapel Hill. It was at its booths that protest leaders planned demonstrations against segregation, the war in Vietnam, and the Speaker Ban Law which forbid anyone to speak at UNC who had a connection to any left wing organization that was deemed subversive.


HARRY'S in 1957, then in the location that became the Fireside in 1960  

I started eating at HARRY'S when I was eleven in 1960. It was the favorite restaurant of my Godfather, Bob Pace, and had one of the least expensive menus in town. I recall my first meal there being a disappointment though. I saw on the menu something called Salisbury steak which I wrongly assumed was similar to T-Bone steak. Sadly, as I learned, Salisbury steak is much more like plain hamburger. Over the next ten years I was involved in civil rights marches, sit-ins, and even became a UNC campus leader of the anti-war movement. HARRY'S is the only place I ever recall going for a meal with like-minded individuals in those days.

As the 1960's came to a close Harry Macklin's son, Ralph Macklin, became co-manager of the restaurant. Ralph has an effusive personality and a had great gift for culinary creativity. Under his guidance the food at HARRY'S got significantly better and  the sandwiches rivaled those of the best New York City Delis. During this time the patrons became more upscale, and  the long-haired-types began to be replaced by sorority girls, especially from the nearby Alpha Chi Omega house, as well as local architects, and students and faculty from the UNC Department of City and Regional planning.


HARRY'S from 1966

All good things come to an end, and HARRY’S closed its doors in April of 1972. If you want a small taste of HARRY'S make yourself a sandwich that Ralph invented called The High Rise. Just get five slices of your favorite bread and place a slice of ham, a slice of corned beef, and a slice of American cheese on one layer, then place some hot pastrami, chicken salad, and a slice of chopped liver on another. Finally place some tuna salad and a slice of Swiss American cheese on the last level.

See the following article for a profile of the Harry Macklin family:  http://www.chapelhillmemories.com/cat/2/75

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The Shack of Chapel Hill

For Chapel Hill residents and UNC students of the1960s and 70s no other bar in town was as quintessential as The Shack on Rosemary Street. It literally was an old shack that seemed to just barely be standing.

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Gooch's Cafe and James Emmitt Gooch

by Charly Mann

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Tripodi's Delicatessen

Tripodi's Delicatessen and Restaurant opened at University Mall on December 8, 1982. It offered Italian, Jewish and German food. Tripodi's was styled after the old corner New York City delicatessen. Among the items they made fresh daily were bagels, danishes, coffee cakes, turnovers, cream puffs, Italian flat breads, rolls, sausage, sauces, pasta and meatballs, cheesecakes, chocolate cakes, lemon cakes, carrot cakes, coconut cakes, Boston cream pies, sour cream choc squares, lemon squares, éclairs, cream horns, and a wide variety of cookies.

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The History of the Carolina Coffee Shop

 by Charly Mann

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Edward Danziger and Danziger's Old World Restaurant

by Charly Mann

In 1936 Edward Danziger was 43 years old and a highly successful confectioner in Vienna, Austria, and was known as the "Candy King". He was also a Jew and he saw the storm clouds of Adolph Hitler in neighboring Germany. He sought a way out of Austria for himself and his family through a Quaker group in the United States. They brought the Danzigers to New York City where he quickly became one of the city's most respected candy makers.

Mrs Franklin Eleanor Roosevelt visits Chapel Hill and Danziger's in 1943

Eleanor Roosevelt actually had dinner at Danziger's on her visits to Chapel Hill

In 1939 Dudley DeWitt Carroll, the first dean of the UNC School of Commerce (later to become the School of Business), who was also a Quaker, convinced Danziger he should relocate to either Durham or Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Danziger looked at both towns and concluded he could make more money in Durham, but that owning a business in Chapel Hill would give him more pleasure.

Edward Danziger with 1950 UNC couple dating at Danziger's Restaurant Chapel Hill

Edward Danziger especially loved that his restaurant was a favorite spot for UNC Chapel Hill couples to go to on a date in the 1950s

Chapel Hill's first upscale coffee bar Danziger's Candy Shop established 1939

Chapel Hill's first upscale Coffee Bar, Danziger's Candy Shop established 1939

On Sept. 12, 1939 Danziger opened his new business Danziger's Candy Shop at 155 East Franklin Street in the location that had been Gooch's Restaurant. Over the years the business evolved into a restaurant and then a gift shop. By the early 1950's it had become Danziger's Old World Restaurant which was modeled on a tavern from Gudesberg, Austria where Danziger had often taken girlfriends in his youth.

Menu Items from Danziger's Candy Shop Chapel Hill    

Some of the favorite menu items from Danziger's Candy Shop and Restaurant Chapel Hill

He said the purpose of the restaurant was to serve good food and be a place where you could make good friends. It was also probably the first restaurant in North Carolina to have something we now call atmosphere. Much of that atmosphere came from the many photos on the wall. For the most part the pictures were of customers of the restaurant, but to have your photo hung you had to have to done some great work in your field. While many Chapel Hill businesses now display photographs of local celebrities and sports stars, Danziger's walls were covered with pictures of the best writers, professors, and poets of Chapel Hill. There were some famous people on the wall like Eleanor Roosevelt, the black opera singer Marian Anderson, and opera tenor Jan Peerce, but each of these people had actually eaten at Danziger's.

Edward

"Papa D"  Danziger in the window of his restaurant and gift shop on Franklin Steet in Chapel Hill 1955

Above the pictures were what Danziger called his wall of mottos, which the public referred to as the quotation wall. He believed the most important thing you can learn in life is a foreign language and his mottos were written in fourteen different languages. He offered 10 pounds of candy to any person who could translate all 14 quotes, but only one person, a UNC professor ever did. Among his mottos on the wall were, "the beauty of your home is not represented by the walls, but by the cooking" which was in Russian; "he who doesn't appreciate coffee, doesn't know how to live," which was in Turkish, and in Greek "recognize yourself".

Danziger's Smorgasbord Chapel Hill 1953 dinner for two and show $2.75

Fancy dinner and a show for two at Danziger's Old World Restaurant March 1953 for $2.75

Throughout the 1950s and early 60s Chapel Hillians made a point of taking their out of town friends and relations to Danziger's Old World Restaurant so they could see what made Chapel Hill so extraordinary and unique. It was also where you went to see friends and have great food.

At this time Danziger was also probably the most loved businessman on Franklin Street and was known affectionately by almost all his customers as "Papa D." Danziger said, "I like people. I like to talk to people. I like people to talk to me." He especially loved female people. He was fond of saying; "there are half as many good men as women - and no man in history did anything worthwhile unless there was a woman behind him."

Edward Danziger's gravestone in the Chapel Hill cemetery

Edward "Papa" Danziger's gravestone Chapel Hill cemetery

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Mama Dip's - More a Legend than a Restaurant

by Charly Mann

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Chapel Hill's Bars in the 1970s

by Charly Mann

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Brady's Restaurant Chapel Hill

by Charly Mann

 

Brady's was one of Chapel Hill’s most popular restaurants for more than forty years. It opened in 1941 and closed in the early 1980s when commercial property values skyrocketed and it was sold and torn down to be replaced by the Siena Hotel. Today, that location is in what is considered central Chapel Hill, and is designated as being on East Franklin Street, but until the late 1960s it was a mile out of town on the Durham Highway.

Brady's Restaurant and ESSO Gas in Chapel Hill NC 1942
This is the first ad for Brady's Restaurant in Chapel Hill. It is from early 1942, when it was also a gas station.

For much of Chapel Hill's history there has been a strong cultural division between "town and gown". People who grew up in Chapel Hill and were not assiciated in an educational capacity at the University had significantly different tastes in food, clothing, church membership, and politics than those who "immigrated" to Chapel Hill to teach or be administrators. Brady's was the most popular eating establishment for townies as well as anyone who enjoyed traditional home-style southern food. It had the best fried chicken ever served in a restaurant and they made incredible thick and long french fried potatoes to compliment it. For those looking for a way to blackmail me, my favorite dish at Brady's was their southern fried chicken gizzards. While the taste and texture of their gizzards are difficult to describe, they were definitely chewy with a delightful flavor. (I've been a vegetarian for most of the last twenty-five years, so chicken gizzards are no longer part of my diet.)

Brady's Restaurant Pork Barbecue Chapel Hill NC
Brady's Restaurant ad from 1950 when Southern Pork Barbecue was also a specialty


Bradys Restaurant Carry-Out and Brady's Frozen Custard, Chapel Hill, NC from 1963

Other favorites at Brady’s were their pork chops and mouthwatering authentic Red Snapper. Meals at Brady’s were large and consistently good, and their menu prices were at least 1/3 less of most other local restaurants. The manager of Brady's for as long as I can recall was Louis Taylor. Brady's also owned and operated Chapel Hill's first drive-in restaurant directly across the street. It was particularly popular for having the only soft serve ice cream in town. Behind Brady's was a cinder block building which was used by local farmers to sell their produce.

Brady's Frozen Custard Chapel Hill NC
Brady's opened their very popular Frozen Custard drive-in in 1952. This was Chapel Hill's first drive-in and fast food restaurant. (Ad from 1955)

During the civil rights struggle in Chapel Hill, from 1961 to 1964, Brady's like most other restaurants that catered to townies, remained segregated despite numerous protests and sit-ins. On the same day the Beatles were revolutionizing the music world with their first appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show in February 1964, 26 people were arrested at a sit-in at Brady’s and hauled away in the back of a paddy wagon. 

Brady's Home-cooked meals Chapel Hill NC 1966
Ad from the then integrated Brady's Restaurant Chapel Hill, NC (1966)

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The Pyewacket Restaurant (1977 - 2002)

by Charly Mann

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The Porthole, Their Rolls, and The Recipe

by Charly Mann

There are many things that people in Chapel Hill disagree on, but anyone who ever ate at the Porthole restaurant will tell you that they not only had the best rolls in the world, they were to die for.

The Porthole was located on Porthole Alley, off the 100 block of East Franklin Street. There are many things that made it unique, but only their yeast rolls made them unforgettable. In the Porthole you got a menu with a checklist where you indicated what you wanted. Two things that everyone got there was their iced-tea; which may have been the sweetest in Chapel Hill, and the rolls which you got an unlimited supply of. They were also famous for their Chef Salad, but everything on the menu tasted like the best home cooked food you ever had. It was also ridiculously inexpensive. I do not recall ever spending more than $2.00 for a meal when I ate there from the early 1950s to the mid 1970s.

The Porthole Restaurant Porthole Alley Chapel Hill, NC

The Porthole Restaurant of Chapel Hill was home of the world's best ice tea and rolls

Their rolls were always warm and right out of the oven. I had a friend who called them Hot-Buttered rolls, but to me they were Porthole rolls. Bob Vermillia managed the Porthole. I think the owner lived in Durham, and had the last name of Timmons. I remember one long time waiter was named Wallace Oldham.

The History of the Porthole Restaurant Chapel Hill

The Porthole Restaurant of Chapel Hill is no more and is now the Enterprise Resource Panning Department for UNC

Since the Porthole is no longer in existence, I will share a recipe that I guarantee will rekindle the tastes of those rolls. Just make sure to have some extra-sweet iced-tea on hand to drink with them. I should also warn you that the magic of these things disappears when they cool down.

The Porthole, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Required ingredients:

· 1 cup whole milk
· 2 pkg. dry yeast
· ½ cup butter, melted
· ¼ tsp. salt
· ¼ cup sugar
· 2 eggs
· 4-1/2 to 5 cups flour
· You will also need some additional melted butter

First warm the milk in a small saucepan over low heat. Mix 1/3 of the milk with the dry yeast in a small bowl and let sit until bubbly, about 15 minutes. In a large bowl, combine remaining milk, melted butter, salt and sugar and beat until the sugar is dissolved. Then add the beaten eggs and bubbly yeast.

Next add your flour, ¼ cup at a time, beating on high speed with a stand mixer. When the dough gets too stiff to beat, stir in rest of flour by hand, if necessary, to make a soft dough. Turn out onto floured surface and knead for 5 minutes, until smooth and satiny. Place dough in greased bowl, turning to grease top. Cover and let rise in warm place until light and doubled in size, about 1 hour. (You can also place covered the dough in the refrigerator overnight. This works really well. Let the dough stand at room temperature for 1 hour before proceeding with recipe.)

Punch down the dough and roll out on floured surface to ½” thickness. Cut with 3” round cookie cutter. Brush each roll with melted butter and fold in half to make half circles. Pinch edge lightly to hold, so the rolls don’t unfold as they rise. Place in 2 greased 13x9” pans, cover, and let rise again until double, about 45 minutes. (If you refrigerated the dough, this will take longer, about 60-75 minutes.)

Bake rolls at 350 degrees F for 20-25 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from pan immediately and brush with more melted butter. Don’t use the same butter you used when forming the rolls - melt some fresh just for this step. Makes about 24 rolls.

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New Year's Eve At The Ranch House 1964

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What I Loved About the Zoom Zoom

by Charly Mann

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Bite Sized Facts Link



Chapel Hill is located on a hill whose only distinguishing feature in the 18th century was a small chapel on top called New Hope Chapel. This church was built in 1752 and is currently the location of The Carolina Inn. The town was founded in 1819, and chartered in 1851.

 

 

What is it that binds us to this place as to no other? It is not the well or the bell or the stone walls. or the crisp October nights. No, our love for this place is based upon the fact that it is as it was meant to be, The University of the People.

-- Charles Kuralt

 

 

Dark Side of the Hill -- Pink Floyd, the creators of the most popular album in history, Dark Side of the Moon, took the second half of their name from Floyd Council, a Chapel Hill native, and great blues singer and guitarist. He once belonged to a group called "The Chapel Hillbillies".

 

 

Check out Charly Mann's other website:
Oklahoma Birds and Butterflies

http://oklahomabirdsandbutterflies.com

 



We need your help. Send your submissions, ideas, photos, and questions to CHMemories@gmail.com.

 

 

 

 

There would probably be no Chapel Hill if the University of North Carolina Board of Trustees in 1793 had not chosen land across from New Hope Chapel for the location of the university. By 1800 there were about 100 people living in thirty houses surrounding the campus.

 

 

The University North Carolina's first student was Hinton James, who enrolled in February, 1795. There is now a dormitory on the campus named in his honor.

 

 

 

 

The University of North Carolina was closed from 1870 to 1875 because of lack of state funding.

 

 

 

 

William Ackland left his art collection and $1.25 million to Duke University in 1940 on the condition that he would be buried in the art museum that the University was to build with his bequest. Duke rejected this condition even though members of the Duke Family are buried in Duke Chapel. What followed was a long and acrimonious legal battle between Ackland relatives who now wanted the inheritance, Rollins College, and the University of North Carolina, each attempting to receive the funds. The case went all the way to the United States Supreme Court, and in 1949 UNC was awarded the money for the museum. Ackland is buried near the museum's entrance. When the museum first opened, in the early sixties, there were rumors that his remains were leaking out of the mausoleum.

 

 

The official name of the Arboretum on the University of North Carolina campus is the Coker Arboretum. It is named after Dr. William Cocker, the University's first botany professor. It occupies a little more than five acres. It was founded in 1903.

 

 

Chapel Hill's main street has always been called Franklin Street. It was named after Benjamin Franklin in the early 1790s.

 

 



We need your help. Send your submissions, ideas, photos, and questions to CHMemories@gmail.com.

 

 

Chapel Hill High School and Chapel Hill Junior High were on Franklin Street in the same location as University Square until the mid 1960s.

 

 

The Colonial Drug Store at 450 West Franklin Street was owned and operated by John Carswell. It was famous for a fresh-squeezed carbonated orange beverage called a "Big O". In the early 1970s, I managed the Record and Tape Center next door, and must have had over 100 of those drinks. The Colonial Drug Store closed in 1996.

 

 

Sutton's Drugstore, which opened in 1923, has one of the last soda fountains in the South. It is one of the few businesses remaining on Franklin Street that was in operation when I was growing up in the 1950s.

 

 

Future President Gerald Ford lived in Chapel Hill twice. First when he was 24, in 1938, he took a law couse in summer school at UNC. He lived in the Carr Building, which was a law school dormitory. At the same time, Richard Nixon, the man he served under as Vice President, was attending law school at Duke. In 1942, Ford returned to Chapel Hill to attend the U.S. Navy's Pre-Flight School training program. He lived in a rental house on Hidden Hills Drive.

 

 

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